*MAP Announcement*

As we continue to grow, we are looking for qualified people to be Technical Assistance Providers in North Dakota, Southern Minnesota, and Wyoming.

Clerk & Board Training scheduled in Granite Falls, MN: August 28th.

Operator Certification Prep. scheduled in Cass Lake, MN: September 4th.

 

End of an Era

After over 35 years of outstanding work and commitment, MAP is proud to announce the retirement of Joseph Dvorak, better known by his friends in the industry as Joe-D, effective June 30, 2014. As one of the founders of the company, Joe will leave a legacy behind. "MAP will dearly miss having Joe on our team, but we wish him the best in his future endeavors," said Mike Brownfield.

To continue reading, click here.

 

 

Midwest Assistance Program Helps Rural Communities Get Safe, Affordable Water

Grantees of ACF’s Rural Community Development (RCD) program provide training and technical assistance on safe, affordable water and waste water systems in low income communities and tribal areas, many with populations at or below 2,500 people. Unlike large, urban areas with dedicated staff to address water needs and manage and maintain systems, these small communities often have a shortage of experienced and professional staff.

One successful RCD grantee is the Midwest Assistance Program (MAP). MAP provides on-site technical, managerial and financial assistance to rural and tribal communities in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana and Wyoming.

The City of Coleman, South Dakota, requested MAP assistance to help address discrepancies in water records, water main breaks and areas of stagnant water. The city’s current water meters had become obsolete and unserviceable. MAP helped the city develop and submit the State Water Plan Application and funding applications. MAP helped secure funds for additional meter and water main projects and they will help the City of Coleman repair and/or replace all the water mains in the entire community.

With funding from ACF’s RCD program, MAP continues to work with the community as part of the Water Main Project and helps to ensure that the people of the City of Coleman have a safe, secure and clean water and wastewater infrastructure.

 

Why Americans are Not Talking About the Water Infrastructure Crisis

The U.S. water infrastructure is aged and decaying. In fact, the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Water Innovations Alliance foundation rate the U.S. water infrastructure at a “D-.”  The EPA estimates repairing and updating the water infrastructure at $365 billion. Many pipes were installed prior to World War II and now lead to, on average, 700 main breaks a day.

Why is this important and critical to address?  Click here to read the entire story posted recently on the Our Water Counts blog.

 

Funding is Available to Assist Your System with Drought-Related Problems

With on-going severe drought being experienced in much of the MAP service area, we are hearing reports about water conservation measures being invoked, drinking water systems becoming concerned about their supply of water, and unusual and costly repairs being caused by the drought.

If your system is faced with making costly repairs such as replacing a pump, motor, or fixing a major line break, and you do not have the funds on hand to pay for such a thing, please be aware that MAP has a revolving loan fund that can be used to pay for such system repair costs.  Continue Reading

 

Have You Ever Considered a Career in Water Operations?

water operator

A comprehensive study conducted in 2005 by the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (now the Water Research Foundation) determined that, within ten years – by 2015 – more than one-third of the water and wastewater workforce will retire. This is a very secure field to get into because operators will always be needed everywhere. And, because operators are on the front lines of protecting public health and the environment, they are the ultimate green jobs!  Operators do not need an extensive education (often not even college), but there is some training and experience needed.  RCAP has produced two brochures that explain what being a water or wastewater operator would entail, and how to go about getting the necessary training.  Additional information, as well as informational videos can be found on the RCAP website.

 

How do we get clean, safe water?

Despite using and benefitting from drinking water and wastewater systems multiple times every day, most of us don't even think about or know how these systems work. It takes a lot, in terms of natural, human, financial and other resources, as well as physical, chemical and biological processes, to bring clean, safe drinking water to your home or to deal wtih the waste you produce from a toilet or washing machine. RCAP has created animated diagrams with short videos to explain some of what is required in treating water. The videos are meant to make non-operators more comfortable with the vocabulary and terms that a plant's operator uses and to help a utility's decision makers understand what is required to operate a dependable and sustainable water utility.

Surface Water Treatment Process